Saturday, May 26, 2012

Being Friday the 25th of May, 2012 ...


A warm, balmy evening:
We had to keep the doors open to create a refreshing draught.
A songbird in a neighbour’s tree seemed to enjoy the music and regularly accompanied in precisely the correct pitch!



Berry knows about birds: even without seeing it, he authoritatively declared that it must be a fringilla coelebs. (That’s a chaffinch to you and me; nobody argued.)

I Could Easily Fall in Love with You: Berry & Ken
Hey Jude: Paul
Bruton Town (Bramble Briar): Colin & Laura
Rare Old Times: Lynda
Stagolee: Roland
J'ai Deux Amours: Angela
Songbird: Elayne
Waiting for the Times to get Better: Mick & Marion
Somewhere Along the Road: Laura & Colin
Grey Funnel Line: Nigel
North Country Maid: Mave
Leaving London: Ken
Hold on Tight to Your Dreams: Berry
Battle of New Orleans: Paul
My Lover's Gone: Laura & Colin
Orphan Girl: Lynda
Liverpool Judies: Roland
Geordie: Colin
Things We said Today: Berry & Ken
Gonna Miss Me When I'm Gone: Angela & Paul
The Ash Grove: Elayne
Peg and Awl: Mick & Marion
The Climber: Marion & Mick
Lord Franklin: Nigel
Waiting at the Church: Mave
Fan-Light Fanny: Ken
Crying, Waiting, Hoping: Paul
Clever Tom Clinch: Laura
Dancing at Whitsun: Colin
The First Time Ever I Saw Your Face: Lynda
Five Years' Time: Angela
Scarborough Fair: Elayne
Your Are my Sunshine: Mick & Marion
Good Old Apple Wine: Marion & Mick
Pleasant and Delightful: Nigel
Our Singing will Never be Done: Mave

Let's all hope that Mave's closing contribution is prophetic!

Addendum:
(01/06/2012)

I wrote that 'nobody argued', but Angela subsequently contended that it was a song thrush, (renowned for mimicry,) that shared our entertainment ...

turdus philomelos

If you follow this link - turdus philomelos - I think you'll agree.

Shame about that generic name: it has no relationship to vulgar Anglo-Saxon useage.
Philomela was an Athenian princess who, after being raped by her brother-law, had her tongue cut out so she couldn't tell of her defilement. Then, according to Ovid, she became a song bird. Her name in ancient Greek possibly translates as 'song-loving'.

3 comments:

Jane Stemp said...

Sorry I missed "Grey Funnel Line" - well, sorry I missed all of it!

Hope to see you this coming Friday...

Jane W (disguised by Google)

Colin said...

... and you missed the avian accompaniment!

Jane Stemp said...

I should obviously have looked on Twitter....